A pink taxi

A pink taxi

June 30, 2012

A Celebration of Dubai





I celebrate my city. I greet it daily. I express my gladness to live in Dubai. I point its wonders to my children. I write about it on my blog and I share my enthusiasm on twitter.




After numerous laudatory tweets, a follower then interjected: @pinktaxiblogger ...any thoughts on the almost transitory nature of residing in dubai? Link to a blog post wud be fab! #insight

A rare occasion for me to write a blog-answer!



People flock to Dubai from all corners and they don't stay for long. Yet I am part of a foreign community that has grown its roots here. My youngest likes to notice that I am "one year older than the Emirates" and I explain laughingly that Dubai was always here, even before the making of the UAE. Yet, his references are not far fetched because we came to this land "on our Mayflower": four generations of a same family have lived on the shores of the Persian Gulf. Persian is now an disused adjective: I am well aware of this, yet I employ it to convey the historical roots of my family.



My daughter asked me where she would live in the future and I responded:"where your heart desires, where your fate takes you." We come from such an intricate melange, that we don't belong anywhere. We move on, in search of education and life-opportunities.



Is permanence what we are looking for? Do we instinctively want to live in the same place as our grandparents did? Aren't we content to be scattered around the world, visiting and even living in cities according to seasons? Will we not profit from global experiences?



Dubai is the city of the future, where people come to work and play, and live and grow along the way. The lifestyle is dynamic and the experience is enriching. It appears to be a city in constant flux, always reaching out for the most modern. Each and everyone one of us living here participates in the grand scheme of things. Does it matter that we come from different countries rather than emigrate here permanently?



In the same way we do stunts in universities, for the shortest time of our lives, we carry the knowledge and the experience from our alma matter and we pride with the very special belonging to that university.



6 comments:

  1. The definition of a Levantine according to historians is the Near Eastern who can adjust to all environments and belongs to none.This definition sounds harsh for a selfish opportunist.It is not the salamander in us that changes color or allegiance ,but the hard working individual who tries to build a new life in a stable,secure and vibrant city:Dubai.
    As someone said,if there was no Dubai in the Middle East North Africa,thank God the Maktoums created one as an oasis of modernism,coexistence and tranquility.

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  2. Dubai welcomed my grandparents 40 years ago. Today, my wife, my sons, and I are making it our home. God bless Dubai and the Maktoums!

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  3. It is very interesting and I really like the expression. I totally understand what you say but it would be a little bit better if you just talked alittle about The cities which surround Dubai because people or westerns if you like wouldn't known UAE has multiple cities or contain of seven cities. I believe this can illustrate some understanding

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  4. Great blog...as usual...and thanks!

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